The clumping form grows in small hillocks and doesn’t mass together to form a grove as running bamboo does, but it won’t take over the surrounding land. A second option is to put a seasonal snow fence in place. If the straight edges of a traditional border hedge strike you as too formal or artificial, selecting a shaggy plant such as willow is not your only option. And most varieties of privet are “deciduous”—that is, they lose their leaves in the winter—so a privet hedge might not provide full privacy year-round. Shrubs planted close together will not grow as wide as when they are standing alone. Enter living fences. Found on Fairy Wings And Dinosaurs. Pay particular attention to spots where animals appear to be getting in or out. Always consult a competent professional for answers specific to your questions and circumstances. Start with a simple sketch of your fence plan, allowing 10 feet between posts. Our … The following plants can make wonderful living fences. Plant cactus plants as a living fence. This is done by using plastic grid fencing attached … Melissa & Michael GabsoRemodel & Redesign Experts In any case, the end result is a lush, green and sometimes flowering living fence that offers privacy, beauty and style. Your submission has been received! Living fences can cost as little as $1 per linear foot. This article was co-authored by Melissa & Michael Gabso. how to make a living fence. Young, small yew plants might sell for as little as $10 apiece, but you can easily spend $50 or more for more mature, larger plants. Living fences can be less expensive, too—installing a wood privacy fence is likely to cost $20 to $30 per linear foot. You can usually buy seeds and clippings for just a few dollars apiece. A wattle fence around each garden bed was a good solution because the ducks were kept out of the plants, but they were still near enough that we were able to reap their bug-hunting benefits. Incorporate different plants into your living fence in sections or layers. Melissa & Michael Gabso. Pyracantha and holly are evergreen shrubs that provide more color than the typical privacy hedge. Melissa and Michael Gabso are the Owners of MC Construction & Decks based in Los Angeles, California. Plant a hedge to use as a living fence. The resulting layered look will reduce the sense that the yard is surrounded by a wall. 3. 7 October 2020. https://www.bobvila.com/slideshow/living-fences-11-boundary-setting-solutions-47520/privet-hedge, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orFmsbON5xU, http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/sustainable-farming/living-fences-zmaz10onzraw?pageid=3#PageContent3, http://www.bhg.com/gardening/trees-shrubs-vines/trees/how-to-build-a-living-fence/, https://www.bobvila.com/slideshow/living-fences-11-boundary-setting-solutions-47520/lilac-hedge, http://www.bhg.com/gardening/trees-shrubs-vines/shrubs/best-flowering-shrubs-for-hedges/#page=1, https://www.lowes.com/projects/gardening-and-outdoor/prune-trees-and-shrubs/project, https://www.planetnatural.com/plant-propagation/, https://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide/article/espalier-fruit-trees, https://www.bobvila.com/slideshow/10-of-the-best-trees-for-any-backyard-49100, https://www.arborday.org/trees/tips/watering.cfm, https://www.bobvila.com/slideshow/living-fences-11-boundary-setting-solutions-47520/cactus-fence, http://www.chicagobotanic.org/plantinfo/helpful_tips_and_after_planting, http://www.succulentsandsunshine.com/how-to-water-succulent-plants/3/, http://www.bamboogarden.com/Hardy%20clumping.htm, http://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/common-plant-diseases, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. The strings help you line up the posts. Prune nonvertically. For example, you might plant several locally-occurring shrubs side by side, or close the gaps in a row of fruit trees with a hedge of flowering plants. Most varieties are not technically evergreen, but bamboo provides an effective privacy fence year-round because it never becomes sparse. [1] Cactus and similar plants are good for dry, arid climates where other types of plants have difficulty thriving. To build a wood fence, start by digging holes in the areas where you want to place your fence posts. I think this … Note the length and width the fence will need to be. Thick shrubs are well suited for lining off crops and flower beds. For evergreen mid-size shrubs like Emerald Arborvitae or Korean Boxwood, 10–15 feet (3–5 m) tall at maturity, plant 3-4 feet apart. It also means that you can choose plants well-suited to the varied conditions of your yard’s perimeter—yew in shady spots, for example, or willows where soil drains poorly. Sow your living fence between trees or posts lining the perimeter of your yard, field or garden for a more integrated, natural look. Indeed, deer might nibble windows into a living fence, though this can be overcome through smart plant selection. With a hoe, prepare the soil, leaving it softer. Are you considering trees or shrubs as a living fence on your property? Some varieties can grow to 50 feet or more. If necessary, check with the local county agency's codes regarding road or easements as well as any utility company's (both for overhead power and phone as well as buried utilities) so that you know your plants can grow safely. Calculating the exact area you intend to fence off will give you an idea of the amount of seeds or clippings you’ll need to plant. Willows tend to prefer moist soil, so they’re good for sections of lawn that do not drain well. Start with a simple sketch of your fence plan, allowing 10 feet between posts. They also can act as barrier against erosion and animal intruders and serve as habitats for many different plant, animal and insect species. Customer Care |  Privacy Policy |  Terms and Conditions |  About Us, Copyright © 2020 Bottom Line Inc. 3 Landmark Square Suite 201 Stamford, CT 06901 Use string and batter boards to lay out the fence. If you can't guarantee that your plants will get the proper amount of water for their first year, there is a good chance they will not survive. A Living Fence Supports Other Species. If your fence is to be especially long or follow an intricate path, you may need to build multiple support structures. Choosing a living fence over a conventional fence can be an excellent option. Nonetheless, planting "living screens" is often preferable to erecting masonry walls or wooden or vinyl fencing, whether you're landscaping a patio or a property line. You only need enough water to thoroughly moisten the soil around the trunk to a depth of a few inches. That might sound pricey, but you can plant willows five feet apart in a living fence, so you won’t need as many of them to form a fence as you would many plants on this list. One option is to have a living snow fence. 5. You can prune border plants into more natural-­seeming “mountain like” shapes that are thicker near their bases, for ­example. Tie wayward rods in place with garden twine to maintain the fence design, if necessary. photo by gardeningknowhow.com. There are 25 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. 2. See more ideas about backyard, backyard landscaping, outdoor gardens. Bamboo (shown above) is a hearty, fast-growing type of grass that can form an elegant, effective living fence. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Position one plant every 18 to 30 inches to form a hedge. Living wall systems include anything from simple grow-bags and panels available from garden centres to ones installed by specialist companies. Trees and large, woody shrubs will only need to be watered once or twice a week. Its fall foliage provides vivid orange and red colors. Last Updated: October 29, 2020 Expect to need one plant for every five to 10 linear feet. Make sure you prepare the soil well by digging in a good amount of compost and organic fertiliser, and making sure the soil is nice and moist. Keep an eye out for scavengers if you decide to line your property with fruit trees. Living fences offer an alternative to traditional structures that provide privacy. The Many Benefits of Living Fences. Arborvitae, juniper and cedar are elegant, attractive evergreen trees that can form effective privacy borders. For agricultural purposes, the fence should be tall enough to provide privacy and confine large livestock like goats, cows and horses, with closely tangled branches that will keep out scavenging animals. She is currently working … Expert Interview. 4. But before you start building a fence, there are a few things you should know first. Place the batter boards just beyond where your fence corners will be located and run strings between them. Horizontal Plank Fence with Metal Posts. Expert Source Make sure smaller branches have enough room to keep growing. To Make Your own ‘Living Wall’ Dig a 30cm wide bed at the base of your newly-laid fence, along the length of it. Eye Health: Top Doc’s Integrated Approach, Face Value: Investing in Metals and Money. Vigilance and frequent attention will help keep your natural fenceline healthy and lush. Holly’s berries typically are red, while pyracantha, also known as firethorn, feature a blaze of red, orange or yellow berries. On the downside, living fences may need pruning, watering, mulching and fertilizing. Retie the plant's stems as needed to shape its growth as it spreads out. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. With over ten years of experience, they specialize in exterior and interior remodeling and redesign, including kitchen, bathroom, and deck construction. Your supports should be wide enough to house a row of developing seedlings. Take a walk around your property once or twice a day. With over ten years of experience, they specialize in exterior and interior remodeling and redesign, including kitchen, bathroom, and deck construction. Some other flowering plants commonly used as natural barriers include rose bushes, lilac and hydrangea. The wood works better if it is green and fresh. You also could…. Young one-to-two-foot-high privet plants often can be purchased for just $4 apiece and grow very quickly, typically adding two to three feet of height per year. MC Construction & Decks also provides plans and permitting services and is known for backyard beautification projects. 7 October 2020. The shrubs will continue to spread and fill out as they flourish. Enkianthus is deciduous, so do not expect full privacy in winter. A few tree species that make excellent living fence options include oak, sugar maple, willow and green giant arborvitae. Oops! X Learn how to build living snow fences. photo by gardenista.com. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. photo by survivallife.com. Next, choose the plants you want you ‘living wall’ to be made up … It also can be expensive—potentially $30 or more per plant. Count the number of corner posts, end posts, and interim posts, and add two rails per section. (If there are a few large trees on the property line, it's best to just end the fence on either side rather than attach the rails to the tree). Young willow trees might sell for $30 to $60 apiece. Towering stands of bamboo are a lush and rapid way to create a natural fence. Hedges such as privet and yew traditionally are pruned into vertical walls, but that’s not the only option. Keep the strings 6 inches away from your property line. People don’t normally think of willows as perimeter plants, but many varieties produce thick, drooping foliage that can form an effective living fence. For deciduous shrubs such as North Privet or Rose of Sharon, plant 2-3 feet apart. Human presence is the best deterrent for keeping animals like deer from devouring your plants. Here, various useful trees are planted along the edge of a path. For that pastoral look, split rail fences are an age-old fencing … Be cautious when pruning plants that are covered with sharp thorns or spines. You can watch the video below to find out how to build a living fence using a vining plant. Incorporate more than one type of plant into your privacy hedge. Bio: Sonya Heathers is a self-taught amateur gardener who has a passion for plants, flowers, and garden design. There are plenty of good reasons to plant a living fence and … Both of these shrubs are adaptable to a wide range of climates and growing conditions. Privet plants can be positioned as much as four feet apart to form a hedge (though two- or three-foot spacing will create a tighter hedge) for a total price as low as $1 per linear foot. You’re likely to encounter two basic types of bamboo in garden centers—clumping and running forms. Confirm that the variety you select will grow to the desired height—some varieties of privet grow to only four feet, while others reach eight, 10 or beyond if not kept pruned. photo by alternative-energy-gardning.blogspot.com. By using our site, you agree to our. Shower the soil around the roots of flowering shrubs and leafy hedges every few days. It is well-suited for acid soils and shade, perfect for the understory of tall trees. Julie Moir Messervy, a landscape designer based in Saxtons River, Vermont. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. Growing vertically offers many possibilities to grow both ornamental and edible plants. 1. Make a chain link living fence. I like the sunset trumpet creeper to form a fence. 3. The Farmers' Handbook, "The Fields" Chapter 10 - Living Fence % 6 7 A fence can also be planted within the farm. Yew grows into a tall, attractive and easy-to-prune hedge. Add a willow living fence. Measure the area you want the living fence to enclose. Prices vary depending on plant size and variety, but expect to pay perhaps $20 to $30 for a young plant in a 2.25-gallon container. References. They produce beautiful berries in the fall and winter, plus white flowers in the spring and early summer. A fence can improve your home's curb appeal, provide security, increase privacy, and offer protection from the elements. While maintaining it will take some effort, you will be rewarded with a beautiful addition to your yard or garden. Landscape screens composed of plants—whether maintained as hedges or … Split Rail Fence. Yew is slow-growing, so if you purchase small plants, it could be many years before they give you full privacy. She is author of Home Outside: Creating the Landscape You Love and creator of the Home Outside Palette landscape design app for iOS and Android. It’s a good choice only in locations where it will not be able to spread, such as between two paved driveways or in a raised planter. Be careful when selecting prolific species like bamboo to use as a living fence, as they can easily spread out of control if they’re not carefully maintained. Prune once a year after the tiny flowers bloom in spring for a more informal hedge and again before late summer if you want a tighter, more formal look. They are planted directly into topsoil to a depth of 60cm (2 feet), to provide support while the roots grow. Overwatering trees can cause them to weaken and die. Secure the diagonal rods at the vertical anchor rods with garden twine. Plant the tall shrubs and trees listed here along the edge of the property, but also ­position shorter plants just to the inside of those tall plants. Remodel & Redesign Experts. These planted perimeters look beautiful and can convey a feeling of peace. Shrubs can be groomed into symmetrical designs or planted in conjunction with other flowering bushes, adding visual appeal your property. MC Construction & Decks also provides plans and permitting services and is known for backyard beautification projects. For the purpose of growing a living fence, clumping bamboo is an excellent species, as you can plant it freely without worrying about it spreading out of control. Using a variety of different plants will make your living fence appear more natural. On the downside, it is slightly less dense than privet…and somewhat slower growing—it could take an extra year or two for enkianthus to provide full privacy. Consider if your environment becomes significantly drier than what your plants are used to and water accordingly. They also are less effective than traditional fences at keeping pets within the yard and other animals out. For instance, it provides “edge habitat” that supports … Her projects include the design of the Toronto Music Garden as well as many public and residential gardens across North America and beyond. Privet can be an effective and extremely affordable living fence. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. A living fence is the perfect way to create borders around your garden and land. It grows well in a wide variety of climates and is far more deer-resistant than the other plants on this list. Simple Pallet “Picket” Fence. Build up to the living fence with plants of increasing height. Living hedge sections come in pre-constructed 1m widths and in heights from 1.2 to 2.5m. Each is available in a range of varieties that generally do not require pruning. You can find cell-grown willows at … Build up to the living fence with plants of increasing height. There are many different varieties you can plant, but we recommend Ficuses and Ferns. But wear thick gloves while pruning them—some hollies have pointed leaves, and pyracantha has sharp thorns. See more ideas about evergreen plants, backyard landscaping, living fence. Spreading a layer of mulch at the base of your trees will help deliver vital nutrients to the maturing roots and protect the trees from dehydration and damage. If there are a few large trees on the property line, it's best to end the fence on either side, rather than attach the rails to the tree. Flowering shrubs attract insects that in turn help pollinate them and prolong their lives. But slow-growing plants require ­infrequent pruning, done best in late winter or early spring. Unlike privet, it’s an evergreen, so its privacy and beauty last year-round. If Plants are too close, they can 'girdle' each other's roots, which essentially chokes them to death. Plant three to 10 feet apart, depending on width at maturity. Expert Interview. First consider the water availability. Within the farm and on the edge of paths, useful plants like worm-wood, Lucaena, lemon grass and marigold have Count the number of corner posts, end posts and interim posts, and add up 2 rails per section. To protect your house, yard and driveways from blowing wind and drifts, plant rows of trees parallel to a driveway or road to act as a barrier to the elements. To build this fence we selected some 2-inch diameter oak and bamboo for the stakes. Squirrels, birds and raccoons are just a few of the animals known for stealing fruit right off the branch. Timely application of nitrogen-rich fertilizers can also help you grow a healthy treeline much faster. Prune shrubs into shapes that complement the look and layout of your property. On the downside, some people find the scent of privet flowers unpleasant when they bloom, typically in late spring. Here are our top tips for planning, designing, and building a fence for your home. If your living fence is a nitrogen-fixing species, it will feed the plants alongside it. Avoid the temptation to water trees until the soil is saturated and soggy. For at least the first five years you need to have the ability to water them if conditions require it. But if you’re willing to wait a few years for privacy, small, young trees can cost $15 apiece. The purest form of a living fence is an intentional, planted array that relies on the living plants to provide both the posts and infill (the two primary elements of any fence). By strategically positioning and tying the plant’s branches, you can create a dense natural gridwork that will keep even the smallest invaders out. Thank you! The cuttings from most plants can be replanted and used to grow more natural fencing. Tips for creating living walls and vertical gardens. Avoiding overwatering your living fence. Then, place the posts into the holes and fill the areas around them with concrete to stabilize the posts in the ground. You’ll see a few DIY privacy fence ideas that grow dense like a hedge and require very little maintenance. A wooden design adds a rustic appeal … Melissa and Michael Gabso are the Owners of MC Construction & Decks based in Los Angeles, California. This could be a line of trees or shrubs up your driveway or in an area where snow can cause a problem or form a snow drift to fill a body of water on your property when it melts. By planting a living fence, you can enjoy idyllic beauty and keep your property in pristine condition without worrying about disrupting the natural order of the world outside your door. Also, as the article suggested, be sure to use treated wood and allow for plenty of airflow while the plants begin growing. Space yews one to two feet apart to form an effective privacy hedge. If your plants stop growing suddenly or appear wilted or colorless, reduce the amount or frequency of waterings. Though much slower, growing a living fence is far cheaper than building a fence with traditional materials like lumber, welded metal, chain link, plastic, etc. Plant four to five feet apart. Yew excels in the shade as well as in sun, making it a particularly good choice for sections of a lawn’s perimeter that often are in the shadow of buildings or trees. A living fence is a permanent hedge tight enough and tough enough to serve almost any of the functions of a manufactured fence, but it offers agricultural and biological services a manufactured fence cannot. As a result, your property may be more exposed. MG Construction & Decks has been rated as one of the top contractors in the Los Angeles area year after year. Remove weeds and other plants from the line of your hedge. This article has been viewed 15,072 times. Whether you grow one from scratch or use a wooden fence as a base, it will add a natural touch to your garden. What kinds of plant should I use for my living fence? Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 15,072 times. You can build a living wall on any solid wall or fence. They are not as fast-growing as many other options on this list, however, and they can be fairly pricey—upward of $100 per plant if you purchase trees that already have reached four-to-six-feet in height. Many varieties of bamboo appropriate for living fences sell for perhaps $30 to $60 for a three-gallon-container size. Plant the tall shrubs and trees listed here along the edge of the property, but also ­position shorter plants just to the inside of those tall plants. Willow’s foliage can have a silver, gold or lime green tint depending on the variety, but different varieties grow to different heights, so choose carefully. Take a look at images of the dense hedgerows in rural England farm country for inspiration. MG Construction & Decks has been rated as one of the top contractors in the Los Angeles area year after year. It may need some support or trellising as it establishes, but ultimately it is a living, growing, self-supporting entity that defines a border. The Publix Song (extended mix): http://amzn.to/2rlM8G8 I just constructed a living fence made from Gliricidia sepium. Bottom Line, Inc. publishes the opinions of expert authorities in many fields These opinions are for educational and illustrative purposes only and should not be considered as either individual advice or as a substitute for legal, accounting, investment, medical and other professional services intended to suit your specific personal needs. That’s a savings of $1,450 on a 50-foot fence. Something went wrong while submitting the form. Note: Yew is a particular favorite of deer. As ecological conditions change and conservation becomes a more pressing issue, farming and landscaping techniques are forced to evolve in order to encourage natural, sustainable practices that are beneficial to the environment. This article was co-authored by Melissa & Michael Gabso. And while many communities have rules restricting the construction of tall fences, restrictions governing the planting of trees and shrubs are rare. % of people told us that this article helped them. Succulent plants like cactus should be watered heavily, then allowed to soak up the moisture until the surrounding soil is completely dry. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/17\/Build-a-Living-Fence-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Build-a-Living-Fence-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/17\/Build-a-Living-Fence-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid8372226-v4-728px-Build-a-Living-Fence-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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